News

Fri
17
Jan
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Roby Superintendent contract approved in a split vote

Roby Superintendent contract approved in a split vote

Roby CISD Superintendent, Keith Cook

Roby CISD Superintendent Keith Cook’s contract was extended through the 2021 school year Monday night, and while a majority of board members agreed with the extension, the motion passed in a 6 – 1 vote.

Cook took the reins as the district’s chief educator in October 2018 after former Superintendent Heath Dickson’s resignation in mid-July of that year. Just two months later, Cook found himself amidst controversy that only seemed to evolve from one challenging scenario to the next.

In December, trustees from both Roby and Rotan school districts tackled the difficult topic of potential school consolidation, which thrust Cook into the literal spotlight, as his second board meeting took place in the school auditorium in front of an audience of angry community members. While wading through the delicate issue and navigating the historic rivalry between the school districts, Cook was also presented with other considerations.

Fri
17
Jan
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Nomadic Newspaper takes in a show in the Mile High City

Nomadic Newspaper takes in a show in the Mile High City

Nicole & Jonathan Hjelmervik with their daughters Maci & Kynadi

The Double Mountain Chronicle recently traveled to Denver, Colorado to attend the National Western Stock Show with the Hjelmervik family; owners and operators of Stand Alone Feed in Rotan, Texas.

If you are traveling somewhere that you think is interesting and exciting or going to meet someone famous, or interesting we would like to invite you to take along the Double Mountain Chronicle, snap a photograph and send it to us to publish in the newspaper with a brief description. You can email the photo to: publisher@dmchronicle.com. 325.933.8129.

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition https://etypeservices.com/Double%20Mountain%20ChronicleID687/

Fri
17
Jan
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Stonewall County struggles to find road superintendent

Although Stonewall Commissioners have been actively seeking a replacement for the county’s road superintendent since former road foreman Don Nail’s resignation some months ago, the county has been unable to find a suitable candidate to fill the position permanently.

While the Stonewall County Road and Bridge Department still has a complement of employees and equipment for maintaining the county’s roadways, an individual to supervise those employees, maintain the equipment, and be accountable for the department has proven difficult. Nevertheless, the work must continue, and commissioners have considered assuming road supervisor duties until a replacement can be found.

Fri
10
Jan
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A year-round Winter Wonderland

A year-round Winter Wonderland

Fredda Buckner and daughter, Angela Messick visiting the North Pole room created by Lois Smith. (PHOTOS BY JEFF HURT)

It all started with a tiny little unfinished church in Illinois almost 40 years ago. Lois Ann Smith’s good friend was a ceramics worker, and although Lois had often accompanied her to the ceramic shop, nothing really ever caught her eye. That is until the day she spied a quaint little church.

Lois asked her friend if she would be willing to clean it and fire it for her, but to her surprise, her good friend said, “no.” However, she instead offered to teach Lois how to do the work herself. “She was extremely precise,” said Lois. “She was an excellent teacher.”

Lois said would explain how the church looked in her imagination, and her friend would teach her how to achieve that vision. And just like that, Lois was hooked on ceramics. That was in 1981. A year later, she found an entire little village that was cleaned and fired, which she was able to buy at a good price.

Fri
10
Jan
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Roby CISD Board to review bond committee recommendation

The 22-member Roby CISD Bond Committee closed in on some final decisions just before the Christmas break, and with over $10 million in renovations and new construction to consider, school trustees will have much to consider during next week’s board meeting.

A potential bond election has been a topic of conversation amongst the administration and board members for over a year. John Blackburn with Live Oak Public Finance LLC first proposed the possibility of a bond last December. Blackburn explained how a bond might benefit the district and how the influx of wind energy companies would be a majority contributor in the repayment of that bond.

Fri
10
Jan
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Back to school after a long winter’s nap

After more than two weeks off from studies, students and teachers are getting back to the educational grind with plenty of teaching and learning to do in the nine weeks before spring break. While extracurricular programs gear up for spring events, classroom teachers are also preparing for spring testing and meeting educational benchmarks and preparing for the upcoming STAAR test in April and May. Between the onslaught of spring events like stock shows, sporting competitions, UIL academics, one-act-play contests, musical competitions all balanced with continuing classroom studies and preparing for state tests for many and preparing for life after high school for some can create a great deal of anxiety, especially after returning from winter break.

“Just breathe,” said Rotan ISD Counselor Katrina Jarvis. “It’s busy. It’s fast. And there’s a lot going on, but everything... will be okay. Just breathe”

Fri
03
Jan
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2020 and the Status Quo

Essays from West of 98

In the 2016 election, and in the post-election national conversations, much was made of the importance of rural America and the rural vote in the outcome of the presidential election. For months afterwards, politicians, pundits, and prognosticators from all political stripes debated the importance of rural America. They opined that rural America had been “forgotten” and that we needed to repair frayed relationships between the distinctly rural, suburban, and urban segments of the country. For the most part, America’s talking class just talked. They used “rural America” to justify their pre-established opinions and determined that their pre-determined policy ideas were the perfect solution for whatever ills were troubling the rural folk.

Fri
03
Jan
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Don’t let the last weed standing reproduce

Article Image Alt Text

Kochia is one of the weeds that has developed some herbicide resistance in Texas.

Article Image Alt Text

A small Palmer amaranth in the middle of two common water hemp plants. (Texas AgriLife Extension Service photo)

When weeds begin showing resistance, it’s not a case of the herbicide changing the weed, it’s a simple “survival of the fittest” case, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist.

Scott Nolte, Ph.D., AgriLife Extension weed specialist, College Station, said the common misconception is the herbicides cause changes. Instead, it’s mainly the inherited ability of a species to survive.

“The problem is these resistant plants become parents because they were not killed out,” Nolte said. “It’s more of a selection, because they were left.”

Building resistant weeds

Target-site mutation is the most common cause of herbicide resistance, he said. This is where a change at the target site prevents the herbicide from binding or otherwise disabling the action, thus preventing herbicidal activity.

Fri
03
Jan
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Do you remember what happened in 2019?

The Editor's point of view of 2019

Seconds ticked by on the clock earlier this week and 11:59 became twelve midnight. Those still awake — and, no doubt, in various stages of sobriety — bid farewell to 2019 and welcomed in a whole new year. As the date at the top of the Double Mountain Chronicle changes to 2020, it’s a good opportunity to look back on some of the headlines and news stories recorded last year, and, of course, allow me to share my view from behind the editor’s desk and address issues to be on the lookout for in the upcoming year.

The City of Aspermont began 2019 with a vacant mayor’s seat after former Mayor Lane Smith tendered his resignation, leaving Mayor Pro-tem Chris Lipham to sign the ordinance for the sale of alcohol within the city limits.

Fri
03
Jan
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Rotan ISD consider real estate purchase

In the final meeting of the year, the Rotan ISD board members discussed the possibility of purchasing an additional house, which recently came on the market. Although the board was not opposed to the idea, they ultimately tabled the proposal until tax valuation information could be provided.

Superintendent Greg Decker informed the board of a Rotan home on E. Johnston St. that recently came up for sale. He described the house as an approximately 1,200 two-bedroom home with an additional room that could serve as a third bedroom.

He said it was in good condition and believes it would be an excellent single person home or perhaps for a young couple. Decker said it would need some repairs and possible upgrades such as plumbing and electrical work, replacing doors, carpet, and some HVAC work, but felt this could be done for around $6,000.

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