News

Fri
03
Jan
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2020 and the Status Quo

Essays from West of 98

In the 2016 election, and in the post-election national conversations, much was made of the importance of rural America and the rural vote in the outcome of the presidential election. For months afterwards, politicians, pundits, and prognosticators from all political stripes debated the importance of rural America. They opined that rural America had been “forgotten” and that we needed to repair frayed relationships between the distinctly rural, suburban, and urban segments of the country. For the most part, America’s talking class just talked. They used “rural America” to justify their pre-established opinions and determined that their pre-determined policy ideas were the perfect solution for whatever ills were troubling the rural folk.

Fri
03
Jan
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Don’t let the last weed standing reproduce

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Kochia is one of the weeds that has developed some herbicide resistance in Texas.

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A small Palmer amaranth in the middle of two common water hemp plants. (Texas AgriLife Extension Service photo)

When weeds begin showing resistance, it’s not a case of the herbicide changing the weed, it’s a simple “survival of the fittest” case, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist.

Scott Nolte, Ph.D., AgriLife Extension weed specialist, College Station, said the common misconception is the herbicides cause changes. Instead, it’s mainly the inherited ability of a species to survive.

“The problem is these resistant plants become parents because they were not killed out,” Nolte said. “It’s more of a selection, because they were left.”

Building resistant weeds

Target-site mutation is the most common cause of herbicide resistance, he said. This is where a change at the target site prevents the herbicide from binding or otherwise disabling the action, thus preventing herbicidal activity.

Fri
03
Jan
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Do you remember what happened in 2019?

The Editor's point of view of 2019

Seconds ticked by on the clock earlier this week and 11:59 became twelve midnight. Those still awake — and, no doubt, in various stages of sobriety — bid farewell to 2019 and welcomed in a whole new year. As the date at the top of the Double Mountain Chronicle changes to 2020, it’s a good opportunity to look back on some of the headlines and news stories recorded last year, and, of course, allow me to share my view from behind the editor’s desk and address issues to be on the lookout for in the upcoming year.

The City of Aspermont began 2019 with a vacant mayor’s seat after former Mayor Lane Smith tendered his resignation, leaving Mayor Pro-tem Chris Lipham to sign the ordinance for the sale of alcohol within the city limits.

Fri
03
Jan
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Rotan ISD consider real estate purchase

In the final meeting of the year, the Rotan ISD board members discussed the possibility of purchasing an additional house, which recently came on the market. Although the board was not opposed to the idea, they ultimately tabled the proposal until tax valuation information could be provided.

Superintendent Greg Decker informed the board of a Rotan home on E. Johnston St. that recently came up for sale. He described the house as an approximately 1,200 two-bedroom home with an additional room that could serve as a third bedroom.

He said it was in good condition and believes it would be an excellent single person home or perhaps for a young couple. Decker said it would need some repairs and possible upgrades such as plumbing and electrical work, replacing doors, carpet, and some HVAC work, but felt this could be done for around $6,000.

Fri
03
Jan
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Positive financial year for Aspermont School District

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MICHAEL EDGIN PRESENTS ASPERMONT ISD BOARD WITH THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT

Michael Edgin, with the accounting firm of, Edgin, Parkman, Fleming & Fleming, PC out of Wichita Falls presented the district's annual financial report just before the Christmas break. Overall, the AISD Board of Trustees learned that while there were some minor issues typical in administrative transitions, the district had a clean report and saw an increase to the year-end balance.

In comparing the district’s original budget compared with the final adopted as well as the actual budget at year’s end, Elgin said 2019 was reflective of good fiscal responsibility of the board and the district’s administration. He reminded the board that both the original and final adopted budget were balanced, and the final numbers at the end of the year exceeded expectations by over $100K.

Fri
27
Dec
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Rotan Board seat to remain vacant

Rotan Board seat to remain vacant

The Rotan ISD Trustees met last Monday night, where after some discussion about options for filling the board vacancy left after last month’s surprise resignation, a majority voted in favor of leaving the seat vacant until the November Election. Superintendent Decker also updated those present on the impending agreement with wind energy companies.

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Fri
27
Dec
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Fisher County to discuss future of rodeo grounds BY JEFF HURT

Representatives from the Red Dirt Mud Bog LLC spoke to the Fisher County Court earlier this month, hoping to establish dates for events in 2020,

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Fri
27
Dec
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School Board Spotlights for December

School Board Spotlights for December

Rotan Academic UIL participants - Jordyn Menchaca, Kate Van Poppel, Avery Gonzalez,Paxton Pipes, John Fillingim, Christopher Newton, Roberto Perales Garcia, Madison Fillingim, Jerimiah Pruitt, Layla Yanez, Tucker McWilliams, Sam Helms

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Aspermont school board members honored Students and Teachers of the Month - Valley Bradley, teacher - Emily McLaury, Layne Durham, (not pictured) Migel Rojas, Shelby Martin, and staff member Teddye Myers.

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Fri
27
Dec
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City of Aspermont debate problem properties

City of Aspermont debate problem properties

The Aspermont City Council heard from Danny Barrett with the Texas Communities Group last week on how the city could tackle issues with properties and, over time, work to clean up the community and possibly generate some revenue.

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Fri
20
Dec
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Communities spread Christmas Cheer

Communities spread Christmas Cheer

Rotan Angel Tree Gifts

School districts, churches, businesses, and community groups across the Double Mountain Region, are each, in their own way, working to making sure no one is without during this holiday season.

Going on 15 years, the Aspermont School District has been working with the First National Bank of Aspermont to put up Angel Trees. Community members have picked angels from the tree each ear, assisting dozens of families in need. It has been more than a worthwhile effort that the community seems to enjoy just as much as recipients.

“This is such a good community,” said AISD Superintendent Zach Morris. “Even though some years we cant’ help as many families as we would like, we always have lots of support.”

This is the fifth year Rotan ISD has put up an Angel Tree, and Counselor Katrina Jarvis said this year has been the most successful yet. She said they expect to assist roughly 40 families in the community during this holiday season.

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